Courses

Thursday, 16 December | 2:15 PM - 6:00 PM | Room 308B/C

Presented in English / 영어로 발표 됨

Physical and Graphical Effects in OpenCL by Example

Thursday, 16 December | 12:15 am - 4:00 am | Room 308B/C

There are strong indications that the future of interactive graphics involves a more flexible programming model than today's OpenGL/Direct3D pipelines. That means that graphics developers will need a basic understanding of how to combine emerging parallel-programming techniques with the traditional interactive rendering pipeline.

This course provides an introduction to parallel-programming architectures and environments for interactive graphics, and demonstrates how to combine traditional rendering APIs with advanced parallel computation. It presents several studies of how developers combine traditional rendering API techniques with advanced parallel computation. Each case study includes a live demo and discusses the mix of parallel-programming constructs used, details of the graphics algorithm, and how the rendering pipeline and computation interact to achieve the technical goals. All computation is done in OpenCL. A combination of DirectX and OpenGL is used for the rendering.

Level

Advanced

Intended Audience

Developers with a basic understanding of OpenCL who want to implement interesting physical and graphical effects.

Presentation Language

Presented in English / 영어로 발표 됨

Prerequisites

An understanding of the OpenCL pipeline or completion of the introductory OpenCL course.

Syllabus

Implementing a Basic Graphics Pipeline in OpenCL 
  Ray Tracing with OpenCL 
     Basic implementation 
     Optimizations 

Fluid Simulation
  Basic SPH Implementation 
  Optimizations 

Real-Time Volumetric Reconstruction and Rendering for 3D Optical Coherence Tomography

Conclusion and Q&A

Justin Hensley
Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.

Derek Gerstmann
University of Western Australia

Jason Yang
Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.

Instructor Bios

Justin Hensley
Justin Hensley is a senior member of the technical staff in AMD's Office of the CTO focusing on parallel programming using graphics processors. Since joining AMD, he has been involved with projects such as face recognition, depth extraction, and game physics. Recently, he has been involved with driving the compute requirements of next-generation graphics processors. He received his PhD in computer science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2007. He also holds an MS in electrical engineering and a BS in electrical engineering and computer science engineering from the University of California, Davis.

Derek Gerstmann
Derek Gerstmann is a research fellow at the University of Western Australia focusing on visualization and data analysis for the BioImaging Initiative, co-funded by the Western Australian Supercomputer Program (WASP) and the Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation and Analysis (CMCA). His knowledge and experience in parallel and distributed computation comes from a diverse professional career, including engineering positions at AMD/ATI, Apple Computer, and Weta Digital. He received his MSc from the National Centre for Computer Animation (NCCA) at Bournemouth University and his BSc from the University of Washington.

Jason Yang
Jason Yang is a member of the technical staff in AMD's Office of the CTO currently focused on GPGPU research. Major projects he has been involved in include H.264 and VC-1 shader decoding and custom anti-aliasing with edge detection. Recently, he worked on AMD's Stream Computing SDK. He received his PhD in computer science and his BS in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2005 and 1999 respectively.