The 38th International Conference And Exhibition on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques

Touch Interface on Back of the Hand

West Building, Ballroom B

This new computer-human interface uses the back of the hand for inputting data.

Many touch-based interfaces present various types of buttons on small screens. But there is one drawback with this approach. Users cannot feel haptic feedback (“clicks”, for example), because the displays do not have physical buttons or provide any visual or auditory cues. Using our skin as an input surface can solve this problem, because we can feel and know which area is tapped.

Building on previous studies that used human skin as an input interface, this project focuses on the opisthenar area (back of the hand), which is relatively flat and convenient. Users can feel precise tactile feedback since the skin on the hand is more sensitive than skin in other locations. One potential advantage of this approach is that many people wear wristwatches. If those devices could be enhanced so they can detect finger position on the opishtenar, additional external devices will not be necessary.

Kei Nakatsuma
The University of Tokyo

Hiroyuki Shinoda
The University of Tokyo

Yasutoshi Makino
Keio University

Katsunari Sato
Keio University

Takashi Maeno
Keio University