Focus Games

SIGGRAPH 2010 offers an unparalleled bounty of information related to game development in all conference programs:

  • Courses with significant game-development content include Advanced Techniques in Real-Time Hair Rendering and Simulation; Advances in Real-Time Rendering in 3D Graphics and Games (I & II); An Introduction to 3D Spatial Interaction With Videogame Motion Controllers; Beyond Programmable Shading (I & II); Color Enhancement and Rendering in Film and Game Production; Gazing at Games: Using Eye Tracking to Control Virtual Characters; Global Illumination Across Industries; Perceptually Motivated Graphics, Visualization, and 3D Displays; Physically Based Shading Models in Film and Game Production; Recent Advances in Real-Time Collision and Proximity Computations for Games and Simulations; and Stylized Rendering in Games.

  • Talks of direct interest to game developers include A Deferred-Shading Pipeline for Real-Time Indirect Illumination, Curvature-Dependent Reflectance Function for Rendering Translucent Materials, How to Get From 30 to 60 Frames Per Second in Video Games for "Free", Irradiance Rigs, Screen Space Classification for Efficient Deferred Shading, Split-Second Motion Blur, Practical Morphological Anti-Aliasing on the GPU, REYES Using DirectX 11, and User-Generated Terrain in ModNation Racers.

  • Live Real-Time Demos showcase cutting-edge real-time rendering applications, including games such as Blur, God of War III, and LOVE.

  • The Computer Animation Festival also features game-related content; one of the Production Sessions discusses The Making of God of War III, and the Electronic Theater and Commercials & Cinematics screening include several game commercials and cinematics.

  • In the Exhibition, various game-technology vendors show their latest products and many present Exhibitor Tech Talks of interest to game developers.

  • Several Birds of a Feather sessions focus on topics of interest to the game industry, such as COLLADA, OpenCL and OpenGL.

Beyond the content directly related to game development, film production topics are also often relevant to game developers. One example is the use of spherical harmonics and precomputed occlusion in “Avatar”, as discussed in two Talks and one Technical Paper . Other examples can be found among the many film production presentations by the makers of films such as “2012”, “Alice in Wonderland” , “Avatar”, “How to Train Your Dragon”, “Iron Man 2”, “Shrek Forever After”, “Tangled”, “The Last Airbender”, “Toy Story 3”, and “TRON: LEGACY”.

In addition to practical production techniques of short-term interest, SIGGRAPH 2010 also presents forward-looking research that is likely to guide future developments. The Technical Papers program presents advanced graphics research, Panels speculate on future research directions, and Emerging Technologies features hands-on demonstrations of novel interaction methods and devices.

And opportunities for informal collaboration and exchange are everywhere. Throughout the week, SIGGRAPH 2010 attendees meet, network, and talk shop with the world’s top computer graphics talents.

See you in LA!

Troy Dunniway

SIGGRAPH 2010 Director of Gaming

GlobeX Studios

Games Sessions

The Sandbox

The Sandbox
Sunday, 25 July | 12:00 PM

Test drive current game-development technologies, explore game design, and play the games that are defining the next generation of digital interactivity.

Physically Based Shading Models in Film and Game Production

Courses
Sunday, 25 July | 2:00 PM

Physically grounded shading models have been known for many years, but they have only recently started to replace the "ad-hoc" models in common use for both film and game production. Compared to "ad-hoc" models, which require laborious tweaking to produce high-quality images, physically-based, energy-conserving shading models easily create materials that hold up under a variety of lighting environments. These advantages apply to both photorealistic and stylized scenes, and to game development as well as production of CG animation and computer VFX. Surprisingly, physically based models are not more difficult to implement or evaluate than the traditional "ad-hoc" ones.

This course begins with a short explanation of the physics of light-matter interaction and how it is expressed in simple shading models. Then several speakers discuss specific examples of how shading models have been used in film and game production. In each case, the advantages of the new models are demonstrated, and drawbacks or issues arising from their usage are discussed. The course also includes descriptions of specific production techniques related to physically based shading.

COURSE SCHEDULE

2 pm
Background: The Physics of Shading
Hoffman

2:30 pm
Practical Implementation of Physically Based Shading Models at tri-Ace
Gotanda

3 pm
Crafting Physically Motivated Shading Models for Game Development
Hoffman

3:30 pm
Break

3:45 pm
Terminators and Iron Men: Image-Based Lighting and Physical Shading at ILM
Snow

4:30 pm
Faster Photorealism in Wonderland: Physically Based Shading and Lighting at Sony Pictures Imageworks
Martinez

5 pm
Conclusion, Q&A
Gotanda, Hoffman, Martinez

Stylized Rendering in Games

Courses
Monday, 26 July | 9:00 AM

As they matured, the visual arts (painting, sculpture, photography, and architecture) all developed new visual-abstraction mechanisms to go beyond "realism" .  Recent advances in visual effects have put film and games into this transitional state.  In a sense, we're like artists at the end of the Renaissance: we've nearly mastered photorealism, but are only at the beginning of our discoveries about expression and perception.

Some film effects are subtle, like the color shifts and post-processing in Mirror's Edge. Others, such as the graphic-novel look of Prince of Persia, dominate the entire rendering style.  In games, real-time and interactive constraints require more efficient and robust solutions than are employed elsewhere in computer graphics. And to be successful, a stylized renderer must integrate with appropriately stylized models, animation, and audio to form a coherent virtual world and ultimately enhance game play.

In this course, leading game developers candidly discuss the challenges of creating and implementing a stylized artistic vision for a game. Each speaker covers a specific game aspect, such as the art pipeline, rendering algorithms, art direction, and modeling.  

COURSE SCHEDULE

9 am
Introduction
McGuire

9:20 am
Monday Night Combat
Chandana "Eka" Ekanayake

9:40 am
The Illustrative Rendering of Prince of Persia
St-Amour

10 am
Personalized Cool Characters in Brink
Calver

10:15 am
Break

10:30 am
Style and Gameplay in the Mirror's Edge
Halén

11 am
Cartoon 3D for Battlefield Heroes
Halén

11:15 am
Making Concept Art Real for Borderlands
Thibault and Martel

11:35 am
Panel Discussion and Questions
All

The Sandbox

The Sandbox
Monday, 26 July | 9:00 AM

Test drive current game-development technologies, explore game design, and play the games that are defining the next generation of digital interactivity.

Recent Advances in Real-Time Collision and Proximity Computations for Games and Simulations

Courses
Monday, 26 July | 2:00 PM

It is quite challenging for beginners to keep up with all the published papers and evolving rendering systems for collision detection and other proximity queries. This course presents an overview of existing techniques, practical solutions, and how the field will change in the coming years. It explains recent developments designed to achieve interactive performance for large-scale rigid, articulated, deforming, and fracturing models in various applications. It also covers two popular physics libraries, Bullet and PhysX, and explains how they implement various proximity queries and can be used for various simulations.

COURSE SCHEDULE

2 pm
Course Introduction
Yoon

2:10 pm
Introduction to Collision and Proximity Queries
Manocha

2:30 pm
Proximity Queries for Rigid and Articulated Characters
Kim

3 pm
Collision Detection for Deformable and Fracturing Models
Yoon

3:30 pm
Break

3:45 pm
GPU-Based Proximity Computations
Manocha

4:15 pm
Optimizing Proximity Queries for CPU, SPU and GPU
Coumans

4:45 pm
PhysX and Proximity Queries
Tonge

Split Second Screen Space

Talks
Monday, 26 July | 2:00 PM
Screen Space Classification for Efficient Deferred Shading
This talk introduces a general, extendible method for screen classification and demonstrates how its use accelerated shadowing, lighting, and post processing in Disney's Split/Second video game.
How to Get From 30 to 60 Frames Per Second in Video Games for "Free"
A novel technique for video games that combines the best of both high-quality rendering at 30 frames per second and the natural motion of objects refreshing at 60 frames per second with very minimal memory and performance overhead.
Split-Second Motion Blur
A real-time method for high-quality motion blur, which is critical to delivering a sense of speed in video games. The method combines tightly tuned image and texture-space sampling techniques to yield an effective general-purpose algorithm.
A Deferred-Shading Pipeline for Real-Time Indirect Illumination
This work presents a screen-space technique for computing approximate indirect illumination in real time that is suitable for video games.

Live Real-Time Demos

Computer Animation Festival - Live Real-Time Demos
Monday, 26 July | 4:30 PM

Experience video games and real-time simulations that push the boundaries of what users and viewers have come to expect. No post-production, just great interactive graphics demonstrated in real time. Selected projects will be available to try in The Sandbox.

Color Enhancement and Rendering in Film and Game Production

Courses
Tuesday, 27 July | 9:00 AM

Production of convincing and compelling scene representations on limited display media is a challenge common to painting, photography, film production, and computer graphics. The core of the problem is finding a transformation from the colors in the original scene to those in the final image. For almost 200 years, this transformation has been primarily determined by the chemical and optical properties of film, which have been carefully engineered for pleasing results (the "film look"). Digital color enhancement has vastly extended the variety of possible looks, but the "film look" remains the default baseline.

Despite its importance in film and game production, the transformation from scene-referred to display-referred colors (also called "rendering"; not to be confused with the more common computer graphics meaning of the term) is little-understood by many practitioners. This course covers the relevant theory, practical production methods, techniques and considerations relating to color enhancement, and rendering in both film and game production.

COURSE SCHEDULE

9 am
Introduction
Hoffman

9:05 am
From Scene to Screen

9:35 am
Color Management
Goldstone

9:55 am
Color Spaces and Operations
Selan

10:15 am
Color at Pixar: Ingredients for Creativity
Glinn

10:35 am
Break

10:50 am
The Craft of Color Grading
Levinson

11:10 am
Filmic Tonemapping for Real-time Rendering
Duiker

11:30 am
Film Simulation for Videogames
Gotanda

noon
Color Enhancement for Videogames
Hoffman

The Sandbox

The Sandbox
Tuesday, 27 July | 9:00 AM

Test drive current game-development technologies, explore game design, and play the games that are defining the next generation of digital interactivity.

COLLADA

Birds of a Feather
Tuesday, 27 July | 1:00 PM

See cutting-edge DCC tools and applications for gaming, 3D web, and visualization, and artworks generated from COLLADA content-creation-supporting media.

In the News
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