Courses

Full Conference   Full Conference

In SIGGRAPH 2010 Courses, attendees learn from the experts in the field and gain inside knowledge that is critical to career advancement. Courses are short (1.5 hours) or half-day (3.25 hours) structured sessions that often include elements of interactive demonstration, performance, or other imaginative approaches to teaching.

The spectrum of Courses ranges from an introduction to the foundations of computer graphics and interactive techniques for those new to the field to advanced instruction on the most current techniques and topics. Courses include core curricula taught by invited instructors as well as Courses selected from juried proposals.

James L. Mohler
SIGGRAPH 2010 Director for Education
Purdue University

Courses

Applications of Visual Analytics

Wednesday, 28 July | 2:00 PM - 5:15 PM | Room 502 A

The science of visual analytics improves analysts' abilities to understand complex problems by helping them gather insight, detect the expected, and discover the unexpected within their data. This course focuses on applications of visual analytics in a variety of fields. It reviews visual analytics for scientific visualization, tools and techniques for analyzing financial data, systems for healthcare monitoring and management, patent application exploration, and many other applications. And it explores how the latest advances in visual analytics are expanding the breadth of applications for this evolving science.

COURSE SCHEDULE

2 pm
Applications in Visual Analytics: Text Analysis, Network Analysis, Investigative Analysis, Power Grid Applications, and Analytical Reasoning Support
Thomas

2:45 pm
Visual Analytics in Health Research, Emergency Response, Public Health, and Command, Control and Interoperability Environments
Ebert and Maciejewski

3:45 pm
Break

4 pm
Visual Analytics for Patent Analysis
Koch

4:30 pm
Visual Analytics for Financial Transactions and Database Management
Keim

Ross Maciejewski
Purdue University

David Ebert
Purdue University

Steffen Koch
Universität Stuttgart

Daniel Keim
Universität Konstanz

Jim Thomas
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Advances in Real-Time Rendering in 3D Graphics and Games II

Wednesday, 28 July | 2:00 PM - 5:15 PM | Room 515 AB

Advances in real-time graphics research and the ever-increasing power of mainstream GPUs and consoles continue to generate an explosion of innovative algorithms for fast, interactive rendering of complex and engaging virtual worlds. Every year, the latest video games display a vast new variety of sophisticated algorithms for ground-breaking 3D rendering that pushes the visual boundaries and interactive experience of rich environments.

This course is designed to encourage cross-pollination of knowledge for future games and other interactive applications. As the next installment in the now-established series of SIGGRAPH Courses on real-time rendering, it focuses on the best of graphics practices and research from the game-development community, and provides practical and production-proven algorithms. Course instructors include designers and producers from the makers of several award-winning games: Bungie, Naughty Dog, Crytek, DICE, AMD, Rockstar, and others. Topics include many advanced production secrets in addition to practical advice for implementing advanced techniques. Attendees will acquire several highly optimized algorithms in various areas of real-time rendering.

COURSE SCHEDULE

2 pm
Sample Distribution Shadow Maps
Lauritzen

2:25 pm
Adaptive Volumetric Shadow Maps
Salvi

2:55 pm
Uncharted 2: Character Lighting and Shading
Hable

3:45 pm
Destruction Masking in Frostbite 2 Using Volume Distance Fields
Kihl

4:10 pm
Water Flow in Portal 2
Vlachos

5 pm
Conclusion, Q&A
All

Natalya Tatarchuk
Bungie LLC

Alex Vlachos
Valve

Andrew Lauritzen
Intel Corporation

Marco Salvi
Intel Corporation

Robert Kihl
DICE

John Hable
Naughty Dog

Gazing at Games: Using Eye Tracking to Control Virtual Characters

Wednesday, 28 July | 3:45 PM - 5:15 PM | Room 406 AB

This introduction to attention, eye movements, and eye-tracking technologies summarizes previous work in the field of gaze in gaming and presents two case studies in which gaze and voice were combined to control virtual characters and their behavior. The first case study, The Revenge of the Killer Penguins, is a third-person adventure-puzzle game that combines non-intrusive eye-tracking technology and voice recognition to create novel game features. The second case study, Rabbit Run, is a first-person maze game created to compare gaze and voice input with traditional techniques, such as mouse and keyboard controls. The course reviews the lessons learned in these case studies and issues relating to incorporating eye tracking in games. It also proposes ideas for how this field can be developed further to create richer interaction for characters and crowds in virtual environments.

COURSE SCHEDULE

3:45 pm
Introduction

3:50 pm
Eye Tracking

4:05 pm
Related Work

4:30 pm
Case Studies

5 pm
Future Work

5:05 pm
Question & Answers
Sundstedt

Veronica Sundstedt
Blekinge Institute of Technology and Trinity College Dublin

Beyond Programmable Shading I

Thursday, 29 July | 9:00 AM - 12:15 PM | Room 515 AB

There are strong indications that the future of interactive graphics programming is a more flexible model than today’s OpenGL and Direct3D pipelines. So graphics developers need to have a basic understanding of how to combine emerging parallel programming techniques and more flexible graphics processors with the traditional interactive rendering pipeline. As the first in a series, this course introduces the trends and directions of this emerging field, parallel graphics architectures, parallel programming models for graphics, and researchers
who are investigating the use of these new capabilities in future rendering engines.

COURSE SCHEDULE

9 am
Looking Back, Looking Forward, Why and How is Interactive Rendering Changing
Houston

9:20 am
Five Major Challenges in Interactive Rendering
Andersson

9:45 am
Running Code at a Teraflop: How a GPU Shader Core Works
Fatahalian

10:15 am
Parallel Programming for Real-Time Graphics
Lefohn

10:45 am
DirectCompute Use in Real-Time Rendering Products
Boyd

11:15 am
Surveying Real-Time Beyond Programmable Shading Rendering Algorithms
Luebke

11:45 am
Bending the Graphics Pipeline
Andersson

Aaron Lefohn
Intel Corporation

Michael Houston
Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.

Johan Andersson
DICE

Kayvon Fatahalian
Stanford University

David Luebke
NVIDIA Corporation

Chas. Boyd
Microsoft Corporation

Advanced Techniques in Real-Time Hair Rendering and Simulation

Thursday, 29 July | 9:00 AM - 12:15 PM | Room 502 A

Hair rendering and simulation have always been challenging, especially in real time. Due to their high computational demands, they have been largely omitted in real-time applications and studied by only a small group of graphics researchers and programmers. Recent advancements in graphics hardware and software have made real-time hair rendering and simulation possible, but achieving acceptable levels of performance and quality requires specific expertise and experience.

This course reviews accumulated knowledge in real-time hair rendering and simulation, and shows how it can be applied in video games and other real-time applications. It begins with the fundamental techniques for real-time hair rendering and then presents alternative approaches, tips and tricks to achieve better performance and/or quality, an overview of various hair-simulation techniques, and implementation details of the most efficient techniques for real-time applications. The Course Notes include example source code.

COURSE SCHEDULE

9 am
Introduction
Yuksel

9:10 am
Data Management and Rendering Pipeline
Yuksel and Tariq

9:40 am
Transparency and Antialiasing
Yuksel and Tariq

9:55 am
Hair Shading
Yuksel

10:45 am
Hair Shadows
Yuksel and Tariq

11:20 am
Multiple Scattering in Hair
Yuksel

11:35 am
Hair Dynamics for Real-time Applications
Yuksel and Tariq

Cem Yuksel
Cyber Radiance LLC and Texas A&M University

Sarah Tariq
NVIDIA Corporation

Global Illumination Across Industries

Thursday, 29 July | 2:00 PM - 5:15 PM | Room 502 A

Global-illumination (GI) computation has been the subject of intense research in computer graphics for many years, but it has only recently been extensively used in practical applications. Major industries, such as videogame and film production, architecture, and design, now use GI produce CG imagery with increased realism. However, trade-offs differ in these applications, so each uses a significantly different GI computation technique.

This course provides an overview of GI computation in practical applications across and within industries. It focuses on juxtaposing the domain-specific decision processes that influence the choice of a particular solution. Each technique is presented in the context of the objectives and constraints set by the application. The course reviews the strong and weak points of each implentation and possibilities for further innovation. It also presents an overview of the latest academic research results in the various application areas.

Course Notes

COURSE SCHEDULE

2 pm
Introduction to Global Illumination
Křivánek

2:15 pm
Ray Tracing Solution for Film Production Rendering
Fajardo

2:40 pm
Point-Based Global Illumination for Film Production
Christensen

3:05 pm
Ray Tracing vs. Point-Based GI for Animated Films
Tabellion

3:30 pm
Break

3:45 pm
Adding Real-Time Point-based GI to a Video Game
Bunnell

4:15 pm
Pre-computing Lighting in Games
Larsson

4:45 pm
Dynamic Global Illumination for Games: From Idea to Production Kaplanyan

5:10 pm
Conclusions, Q & A
All

Jaroslav Křivánek
Cornell University

David Larsson
Illuminate Labs

Anton Kaplayan
Crytek GmbH

Michael Bunnell
Fantasy Lab, Inc.

Per Christensen
Pixar Animation Studios

Marcos Fajardo
Solid Angle SL

Eric Tabellion
PDI/Dreamworks

Beyond Programmable Shading II

Thursday, 29 July | 2:00 PM - 5:15 PM | Room 515 AB

There are strong indications that the future of interactive graphics programming is a more flexible model than today’s OpenGL and Direct3D pipelines. So graphics developers need to have a basic understanding of how to combine emerging parallel programming techniques and more flexible graphics processors with the traditional interactive rendering pipeline. This course presents the state of the art in combining traditional rendering API usage with advanced task- and data-parallel computation to increase the image quality of interactive graphics.

Leaders from graphics hardware vendors, game development, and academic research present case studies that show how general parallel computation is being combined with the traditional graphics pipeline to boost image quality and spur new graphics algorithm innovation. Each case study discusses the mix of parallel programming constructs used, details of the graphics algorithm, and how the rendering pipeline and computation interact to achieve the technical goals. The focus is on demonstrating what can currently be done, showing how it is done, and pointing out near-future trends. Topics include volumetric and hair lighting, alternative rendering pipelines including ray tracing and micropolygon rendering, in-frame data structure construction, complex image processing, and the future of graphics programming models.

COURSE SCHEDULE

2 pm
Welcome and Re-Introduction
Lefohn

2:05 pm
Keeping Many Cores Busy: Scheduling the Graphics Pipeline
Ragan-Kelley

2:35 pm
Evolving the Direct3D Pipeline for Real-Time Micropolygon Rendering
Fatahalian

3:10 pm
Decoupled Sampling for Real-Time Graphics Pipelines
Ragan-Kelley

3:30 pm
Deferred Rendering for Current and Future Rendering Pipelines
Lauritzen

3:50 pm
PantaRay: A Case Study in GPU Ray-Tracing for Movies
Fascione and Pantaleoni

4:15 pm
Wrapup: What's Next for Interactive Rendering Research?
Houston

4:30 pm
Panel: What Role Will Fixed-Function Hardware Play in Future Graphics Architectures?
Moderator
Kurt Akeley

Panelists
Steve Molnar
David Blythe
Mike Houston
Kayvon Fatahalian
Johan Andersson

Aaron Lefohn
Intel Corporation

Michael Houston
Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.

Kayvon Fatahalian
Stanford University

Jonathan Ragan-Kelley
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Luca Fascione
Weta Digital Ltd.

Jacopo Pantaleoni
NVIDIA Corporation

Andrew Lauritzen
Intel Corporation

Kurt Akeley
Microsoft Research Silicon Valley

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