SIGGRAPH 2008 > For Attendees > Classes > Beyond Programmable Shading: Fundamentals

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Beyond Programmable Shading: Fundamentals

Thursday
8:30 am - 12:15 pm
Room 403 AB
Level: Advanced

Theme: SIGGRAPH Core

This first class in a series gives an introduction to parallel programming architectures and environments for interactive graphics. There are strong indications that the future of interactive graphics involves a programming model more flexible than today's OpenGL/Direct3D pipelines. As such, graphics developers need to have a basic understanding of how to combine emerging parallel programming techniques with the traditional interactive rendering pipeline. This class gives an introduction to several parallel graphics architectures and programming environments, and introduces the new types of graphics algorithms that will be possible.

Prerequisites
Experience with a modern graphics API (OpenGL or Direct3D), including basic experience with shaders, textures, and frame buffers, and/or familiarity with parallel-programming languages. Some knowledge of parallel programming on CPUs or GPUs is useful but not required, because an overview will be provided in the course.

Instructors
Aaron Lefohn
Intel Corporation

Mike Houston
AMD Corporation

Chas Boyd
Microsoft Corporation

Kayvon Fatahalian
Stanford University

Tom Forsyth
Intel Corporation

David Luebke
NVIDIA Corporation

John Owens
University of California, Davis

Instructor Information

Aaron Lefohn
Aaron Lefohn is a Senior Graphics Architect at Intel on the Larrabee project. Previously, he designed parallel programming models for graphics as a Principal Engineer at Neoptica, a computer graphics startup that was acquired by Intel in October 2007. His PhD in Computer Science from the University of California, Davis focused on data structure abstractions for graphics processors and data-parallel algorithms for rendering. From 2003 to 2006, he was a researcher and graphics software engineer at Pixar Animation Studios, focusing on interactive rendering tools for artists and GPU acceleration of RenderMan. Aaron was formerly a theoretical chemist and was an NSF graduate fellow in computer science.

Mike Houston
Mike Houston is a System Architect in the Advanced Technology Development group at AMD in Santa Clara, working in architecture design and programming models for parallel architectures. He received his PhD in Computer Science from Stanford University in 2008, focusing on research in programming models, algorithms, and runtime systems for parallel architectures including GPUs, Cell, multi-core, and clusters. His dissertation includes the Sequoia runtime system, a system for programming hierarchical memory machines. He received his BS in Computer Science from the University of California, San Diego in 2001 and is a recipient of the Intel Graduate Fellowship.

Chas Boyd
Chas Boyd is a software architect at Microsoft. He joined the Direct3D team in 1995 and has contributed to releases since DirectX 3. Over that time, he has worked closely with hardware and software developers to drive the adoption of features like programmable hardware shaders and float pixel processing. He has developed and demonstrated initial hardware-accelerated versions of techniques like hardware soft skinning and hemispheric lighting with ambient occlusion. He is currently working on the design of future DirectX releases and related components.

Kayvon Fatahalian
Kayvon Fatahalian is a PhD candidate in computer science in the Computer Graphics Laboratory at Stanford University. His research interests include programming systems for commodity parallel architectures and computer graphics and animation systems for the interactive and film domains. His thesis research seeks to enable execution of more flexible rendering pipelines on future GPUs and multi-core PCs.

Tom Forsyth
Tom Forsyth has been rendering Cobra MkIIIs on everything he's ever used. In rough chronological order, he has worked on the ZX Spectrum, Atari ST, 386, Virge, Voodoo, 32X, Saturn, Pentium1, Permedia2, Permedia3, Dreamcast, Xbox1, PS2, 360, PS3, and now Larrabee. Past jobs include writing utilities for Microprose, curved-surface libraries for Sega, DirectX drivers for 3Dlabs, three shipped games for Muckyfoot Productions, and Granny3D and Pixomatic for RAD Game Tools. He is currently working for Intel as a software and hardware architect on the Larrabee project.

David Luebke
David Luebke is a Research Scientist at NVIDIA Corporation, which he joined after eight years on the faculty of the University of Virginia. He has a PhD in Computer Science from the University of North Carolina and a BS in Chemistry from the Colorado College. Luebke's research interests are GPU computing and realistic real-time computer graphics. Recent projects include advanced reflectance and illumination models for real-time rendering, image-based acquisition of real-world environments, temperature-aware graphics architecture, and scientific computation on GPUs. Past projects include leading the book Level of Detail for 3D Graphics and the Virtual Monticello museum exhibit at the New Orleans Museum of Art.

John Owens
John Owens is an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of California, Davis. His research interests are in commodity parallel hardware and programming models, including GPU computing. At UC Davis, he received the Department of Energy Early Career Principal Investigator Award and an NVIDIA Teaching Fellowship. John earned his PhD in electrical engineering in 2003 from Stanford University and his BS in electrical engineering and computer sciences in 1995 from the University of California, Berkeley.