Frequently Asked Questions

1. How do I submit a panel topic?

2. How do I submit a position statement?

3. What file formats will you accept for panel topic submissions and position statements?

4. Can I get an extension on the deadline?

5. I'm a public relations representative for a wonderful company/person. How can I get my person heard?

6. I already have a group of people who would like to form a panel. Can we submit as a group?

7. I'm an expert or author of a certain application. Can I propose a panel on that application?

8. If my topic is selected in the first round, am I guaranteed a spot at SIGGRAPH 2006?

9. What, exactly, do panels cover?

10. How do I prepare to be a panelist?

11. Do we have to argue on a panel?

12. What materials should I prepare?

13. I just want to show all the really cool stuff I'm doing. OK?

1. How do I submit a panel topic?
The deadline for panel topic proposals was 2 November 2005.
Accepted Topics    TOP

2. How do I submit a position statement?
All position statements must be though the SIGGRAPH 2006 electronic submission system.    TOP

3. What file formats will you accept for panel topic submissions and position statements?
Plain ASCII text only. Please do not send HTML, PDF, Postscript, Word .doc files, or any other formats other than plain text.   TOP

4. Can I get an extension on the deadline?
No. All deadlines are final.   TOP

5. I'm a public relations representative for a wonderful company or person. How can I get my client heard?
Please have your client submit a topic, or wait until you see the topics, and have your client submit a position statement.   TOP

6. I already have a group of people who would like to form a panel. Can we submit as a group?
Not really. One of you may submit the panel topic and suggest the others as possible panelists. If the topic is selected, the rest of your group can submit position statements, but we cannot promise that any members of your group will be selected.   TOP

7. I'm an expert or author of a certain application. Can I propose a panel on that application?
Panels are for debate, not presentation, so unless you figure out a way of making it a discussion, the jury probably won't accept it.   TOP

8. If my topic is selected in the first round, am I guaranteed a spot at SIGGRAPH 2006?
Topic submission is informal. If your topic is selected, it's because the jury decided that it was one that needed to be heard. You still need to submit a position statement in Phase 2 to be selected to be on a panel.   TOP

9. What, exactly, do panels cover?
Panel topics can be anything of importance to the SIGGRAPH community that have multiple viewpoints with strong representation. Anything from algorithms to ethics to the future of SIGGRAPH itself are all fair game, provided enough people with differing opinions want to hear about it.   TOP

10. How do I prepare to be a panelist?
Know your topic. Strong opinions are good for an argument, but a debate requires knowledge of the subject. Also, be prepared to think on your feet, since you'll be discussing the topic with people who don't necessarily agree with you.   TOP

11. Do we have to argue on a panel?
No. Arguing implies that the panelists aren't listening to each other. While we want to hear differing opinions, we want to hear them in a well thought out way. We expect intelligent discussions of potentially controversial topics.   TOP

12. What materials should I prepare?
Since Panels aren't about presentation, you shouldn't need to bring any materials. It's far more important that you are well informed about the topic, and comfortable discussing it in public.   TOP

13. I just want to show all the really cool stuff I'm doing. OK?
Not OK. Panels are for conversation, dialogue, debate, and discussion. If you want to present your work, please send your work to Papers or Sketches, or organize a Course.   TOP