Wednesday, 3 August

3:45 - 5:15 pm

Wednesday, 3 August

3:45 - 5:15 pm

Room 502B

This presentation describes the results of introducing the concept of computer graphics and computer animation into the assessment procedure for a module of a degree program in electrical and electronic engineering: virtual reality systems.

The fundamental question was whether this source of fashionable education is simply a fad or will it become a closet staple? That is, does the use of educational entertainment improve learning and teaching outcomes in science-based subjects.

The results show that by including a significant proportion of peer-reviewed design material into the syllabus, students become highly motivated and achieve a deeper level of comprehension.

Karen McMenemy

Queen's University Belfast
k.mcmenemy (at) ee.qub.ac.uk

Stuart Ferguson

Queen's University Belfast

Wednesday, 3 August

3:45 - 5:15 pm

Room 502B

This CD, "Vietnam Remembered: Reflections on a War," is the culmination of a web project that solicited remembrances and commentaries from over 5,000 individuals between 1996-2004. It features a dramatic narrative of over 100 photographs taken during the Vietnam War of American and Vietnamese soldiers, street children, Vietnamese civilians, and American protesters combined with commentaries by veterans, read by professional actors. Viewers can explore and consider the various stories told within the dramatic narrative with self-guided selections from the remembrances selected from the web site's collection.

The Educators Program presentation focuses on the process of creating the CD and organizing the content to preserve an historical or cultural picture of an era.

Kenneth Hoffman

Seton Hall University
hoffmake (at) shu.edu

Wednesday, 3 August

3:45 - 5:15 pm

Room 502B

This paper examines how architecture students can use film language to more fully apply 3D modeling and animation software in the architectural design process and in communicating the results. Specifically, the paper covers the work and processes of two teams of six upper-level architectural students over the course of a year-long studio and production of a short computer-generated film. The studio combined architectural-design methods with the process and concepts of film production.

Matthew Knox

Kansas State University
mknox (at) ksu.edu

Wednesday, 3 August

3:45 - 5:15 pm

Room 502B

How museum staff and volunteers can use newer technologies and techniques to storyboard, process, construct, and incorporate small-scale animation and video resources into gallery and education program design without detracting from the objects on display, cluttering the gallery space, or applying a logistical nightmare to an educator's presentation. Specifically, this paper covers development and production of three multimedia modules: a video project documenting Alaska Native artists at work, an animation project on the science of the Northern Lights, and a video-animation project that illustrates the cultural significance and function of the Inupiaq toggling harpoon head.

Roger Topp

University of Alaska Museum of the North
topp (at) gsv3d.com

Herminia Din

University of Alaska Anchorage