Wednesday, 3 August

1 - 2:30 pm

Wednesday, 3 August

1 - 2:30 pm

Room 502B

Forum: Learning Games and Narrative

Should graphics in educational electronic games be 2D or 3D? This research investigates whether the use of 2D and 3D graphics in computer and video games affects how attracted a male is to playing an electronic game versus how attracted a female is. Published research indicates males outperform women in 3D virtual environments; a female's inherent traits could have significant influence on how attracted she is to an electronic game.

Tina Ziemek

Colorado School of Mines
tziemek (at) mines.edu

Wednesday, 3 August

1 - 2:30 pm

Room 502B

Forum: Learning Games and Narrative

There is an increasing amount of specific research on children's interactive learning games and the fascination of video games. "The fact that children spend considerable amounts of time playing computer games is a phenomenon that has not gone unnoticed by educators" [Robertson and Good 2005]. This paper explores how an undergraduate computer graphics program can take advantage of current research while considering the K-12 curricula.

The current traditional undergraduate population consists of a vast reservoir of potential insights, and curricula should be developed to take advantage of these insights. This is one of the first groups of students in which most have had technology available to them throughout their educational careers. This area is just newly explored, and it will take time to understand how it can actually enhance classroom activity and whether these technologies can be successfully integrated into the classroom.

Jana Whittington

Purdue University Calumet
whitting (at) calumet.purdue.edu

K. James Nankivell

Purdue University Calumet

Wednesday, 3 August

1 - 2:30 pm

Room 502B

Forum: Learning Games and Narrative

The role of animated children's educational games can not be understated. With the abundance of television programming that is purely entertainment, children are idling away alarming amounts of time watching only television programs that have no educational substance. Their formative years are hampered by the lack of cognitive stimuli that educational programming can provide.

Based on research on current television viewing habits, programming trends, successful educational television shows, and sound educational principles, this paper maintains that educational games will be a strong component in alleviating the excessive amount of time that children spend with pure entertainment television. Subsequent research on popular educational games has led to development of a basic set of criteria that would provide the most effective educational games. Companies can capitalize on the proliferation of computers in homes and schools, and elevate engaging educational games to a level of prominence among current media outlets.

Patrick McCue

Savannah College of Art and Design
pmccue (at) patrickmccue.net

Wednesday, 3 August

1 - 2:30 pm

Room 502B

Forum: Learning Games and Narrative

How do electronic interactive learning media support constructive learning beyond mere instruction and predefined exercises? This presentation considers the new technical possibilities of virtual interoperable characters as learning companions. Following a brief summary of state-of-the-art interactive storytelling issues that must be considered in the creative process, the presentation shows first experiences from two projects with different approaches that employ playful text-based conversations with graphical animated bots. The results lead to the (surprising) conclusion that the most significant learning process seemed to be achieved by active authors of the conversational dialogues. Beyond an instructive "virtual tutor" (primarily misunderstood as replacing a human educator), different metaphors are suggested that change some expectations for learning with virtual characters. As a result, learners will be viewed as authors who create and shape their own virtual companions.

Ulrike Spierling

Fachhochschule Erfurt, University of Applied Sciences
spierling (at) fh-erfurt.de