Thursday, 4 August

8 - 9 am

Thursday, 4 August

8 - 9 am

Room 502B

From Robert Abel's Sexy Robot of 20 years ago to Tom Hanks' tour-de-force multi-role performance in the computer-animated feature "Polar Express," motion capture and motion tracking have made important changes to how computer animation is planned and carried out for film and game production. The frontier of the analysis, understanding, and quantification of human (and even animal) motion promises many new exciting innovations. This presentation addresses the educational use of motion-capture technology and how it affects curricula. Models for adoption and integration are presented by showcasing animation projects completed by undergraduates at Quinnipiac University and team projects completed by graduate students at Parsons School of Design. A look ahead examines future developments.

Gregory P. Garvey

Quinnipiac University
greg.garvey (at) quinnipiac.edu

Anezka Sebek

Parsons School of Design

Thursday, 4 August

8 - 9 am

Room 502B

One of the most difficult challenges of medical training is accurately simulating real-world conditions. This presentation addresses one solution for training students in the use of an endovaginal ultrasound. Due to the nature of the procedure, precautions must be taken to minimize patient discomfort. With a virtual training system, these and other issues can be addressed more than adequately.

Christopher P. Redmann

Drexel University
redmann (at) drexel.edu

Thursday, 4 August

8 - 9 am

Room 502B

How do we get students to think less about the mechanics of multimedia software and more about its creative potential for telling a story? One way is through collaboration with students in different but synergistic disciplines. This presentation summarizes an exciting new model for interdisciplinary collaborative teaching that provides a richer and more flexible alternative to the traditional team-teaching approach. The model is applied to 3D computer animation and digital music.

Genevieve B. Orr

Willamette University
gorr (at) willamette.edu

Thursday, 4 August

8 - 9 am

Room 502B

This presentation addresses effective design of computer graphics courses for a distance-learning environment. It focuses on three distance-learning guidelines: student motivation, visual appeal, and student interaction.

Dino Schweitzer

Capstone Solutions
dino.schweitzer (at) gmail.com

Thursday, 4 August

8 - 9 am

Room 502B

When people think of virtual worlds, they think of themselves sitting by a computer, in a chair in front of a desk. What's needed is a virtual world in your pocket that you can take with you. Pocket PCs can allow a person to explore a "pocket" virtual world. Their small size makes the experience personal and portable. Of course, you are still sitting in your chair, so we have to take it to the next level: add a digital compass and pedometer. Now you can pull out your Pocket PC and start walking around your virtual world. Add wireless to your Pocket PC and WiFi to your field, and now it's a mutit-user experience. This presentation outline somes of the ideas that could make this a reality.

Jared Bendis

Case Western Reserve University, The New Media Studio
jared.bendis (at) case.edu

Larry Hatch

Bowling Green State University