Thursday, 4 August

1:30 - 3 pm

Thursday, 4 August

1:30 - 3 pm

Room 502B

Over the past decade, several new digital-art programs have been implemented, including animation, special effects, and interactive gaming. These schools have realized the challenge of keeping current with hardware and software as well as training for faculty and technical support. In addition, there is a need to develop a curriculum within the time constraints, learn complicated software, and teach design issues, media, or even necessary management skills, all at the same time.

How is this related to Walter Benjamin's early-20th-century proposal that definfed the "author as a producer" (a change from the ideal romantic concept of authorship to the world of mass media and production). Should we integrate this knowledge in our curricula?

Is project-based learning the answer?

Jurgen Faust

Cleveland Institute of Art
jfaust (at) gate.cia.edu

Thursday, 4 August

1:30 - 3 pm

Room 502B

Aspiring animators, especially student animators, are often solitary creatures. Coincidentally, animation curricula are highly focused on the "solo-flight" model of instruction, in which one student conceives, designs, and completely produces an animation project.

However, with very few exceptions, studios work in collaborative teams, never in solo-flight mode. Project complexity requires artists to specialize so that multiple aspects of a project can be worked on concurrently. While modelers are modeling, texture artists are texturing; while riggers are rigging, the animators are animating the same project. Clearly, the solo-flight model of instruction is counter to industry standards.

This paper lays out the details of the team concept vs. solo-flight problem and its potential benefits to students and future employers. It illustrates one effective team-based solution that keeps students engaged and active throughout the semester. Most importantly, it better prepares students for employment in the animation industry.

Adam Watkins

watkins (at) cgauiw.com

Thursday, 4 August

1:30 - 3 pm

Room 502B

This paper discusses deepening assignments as part of a graphics course in which students are allowed to choose their assignments according to their own interests. The result: students have an opportunity to adjust the course for maximum benefit in the diversified and growing field of computer graphics. The authors have applied this concept for eight years.

Lars Kjelldahl

Nada, KTH
lassekj (at) nada.kth.se

Thursday, 4 August

1:30 - 3 pm

Room 502B

From the beginning, computer graphics research and applications have involved collaborations between professionals in both technical and artistic areas. And collaboration between technicians and artists have been an inherent component of the theatre for centuries. Virtual Theatre merges these two collaborative arenas with the goal of providing a springboard for learning through interdisciplinary collaboration and teamwork. The project is geared toward those who want to enter electronic entertainment industries, where successful collaboration between artists and technologists is crucial to the success of a project.

In the spring of 2004, students in three courses worked together to create a virtual theatre production at the Rochester Institute of Technology. This paper describes the collaborative learning approach taken in these courses and discusses the results and issues that emerged.

Joe Geigel

Rochester Institute of Technology
jmg (at) cs.rit.edu

Marla Schweppe

Rochester Institute of Technology

Thursday, 4 August

1:30 - 3 pm

Room 505

Mary Quinn

mquinn@dreamworks.com