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emerging technologies

SUIRIN



This interactive sound-and-light artwork derives its name from "ukidama," an ancient Japanese ball-shaped glass artifact. The source of the sound and light is inside the ukidama, which is expanded by a digital filter.

Art and Science


Art is an essential part of every life; it is the source of enrichment for our sentiment and state of mind. Communicating with the essence of beauty, which has been lost through the process of modernization, can be recovered through the interactive arts. For example, with regular use at home, SUIRIN's soothing sound and lighting can relieve stress at the end of an exhausting day.

Innovation


As they experience SUIRIN in the real world, users can feel as if they are melting into the water in the container. This illusion is generated by SUIRIN's core technology. First, the container's sound is sampled with FFT (fast Fourier transform) through four pin microphones. After the noise is reduced, it is processed through several effects until, finally, a sound similar to the cry of a "suzumushi" (bell-ring cricket) is produced and projected through 4ch surround speakers. In the meantime, the output level of each speaker is synchronized with the brightness level of the four colors of the LED at the bottom of the container.

Vision


In the next generation of SUIRIN content, a sensor system will read users' moods and sentiments. For example, when users are depressed, the system will sense their emotions and offer a more up-beat sound. SUIRIN content can also be networked. In other words, through sound and light, users can convey their emotions to others in remote places, and vice versa, they can sense how a friend is feeling in a distant place. The content will evolve to create a novel device that people use in their daily lives.

Contact


Satoru Tokuhisa
Keio University
dangkang (at) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Contributor


Masa Inakage
imgl/Keio University
acm.org siggraph.org