SIGGRAPH 2002 Panels Fact Sheet

Conference: 21-26 July 2002
Exhibition: 23-25 July 2002

Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center
San Antonio, Texas USA

www.siggraph.org/s2002

Panels are highly interdisciplinary sessions that spark animated discussion and provide thought-provoking insights from some of the top professionals in the interactive and graphics world. Twelve panels are being presented at SIGGRAPH 2002.

"Panelists who are expert in their fields will debate a diverse set of topics at SIGGRAPH 2002. Included are whether and how games will dominant the 21st century, the future role of digital humans, the impact of displaying and interacting with more and more data, and the implications of 3D character animation in filmmaking," said Christopher David Shaw, Georgia Institute of Technology and SIGGRAPH 2002 Panels Chair. "SIGGRAPH 2002 Panels will also examine the emergence of high-performance computer graphics on mobile platforms."

PANELS HIGHLIGHTS

Animation's Turning Tide
3D character animation is experiencing a sea change. Not long ago, getting 3D animation into Hollywood films was a major battle. Now, the industry can¹t get enough of it. Traditional animators and artists are giving up their reluctance and embracing 3D in droves. What does that mean for those already working in 3D? What can we learn from the traditional animator? What does it portend for the future of animated filmmaking?

Organizer/Moderator
Matt Elson, Walt Disney Feature Animation

Panelists
Carlos Aldonia, Blue Sky Studios
Eamonn Butler and Matt Elson, Walt Disney Feature Animation

Digital Humans: What Roles Will They Play?
Computer graphics technology is now creating digital humans that are virtually indistinguishable from the real thing. The potential benefits are immense in a wide range of applications, including film, video, the Web, and gaming, but there are other implications to consider as well. This panel of experts from each of the major applications of computer graphics examines how far we have come in the use of digital humans, where they are heading, and what they will mean to us.

Organizer/Moderator
Phil LoPiccolo, Computer Graphics World

Panelists
Norman Badler, University of Pennsylvania
Athomas Goldberg, Improv Technologies, Inc.
Evan Hirsch, Electronic Arts
Nadia Magnenat-Thalmann, University of Geneva

Extending Interface Practice: An Ecosystem Approach
Interface ecology is an emerging meta-disciplinary approach in which creation of rich interactive experiences spans many disciplines, including computer graphics, mathematics, gaming, visual art, performance, and cultural theory. Interfaces extend beyond interactive artifacts, activities, and social spaces, forming intricate ecosystems. Interfaces are the catalytic border zones where systems of representation meet, mix, and recombine. Through this recombination, interface ecosystems generate fundamental innovations of form, experience, knowledge, and technology. This panel brings together a diverse range of practitioners who work from concept to experience to interconnect multiple systems within the whole.

Organizer/Moderator
Andruid Kerne, New York University

Panelists
Natalie Jeremijenko, Yale University
Andruid Kerne, New York University
Michael Mateas, Carnegie Mellon University
Thecla Schiphorst, Technical University of British Columbia
Will Wright, Maxis Software

The Future of Computer Graphics: An Enabling Technology?
High-quality computer graphics technology is becoming ubiquitous. Soon, computer graphics will be where word processing is today: everyone uses it, but there are very few people doing basic research in word processing. Our challenge now is to apply computer graphics technology to research in other areas. This panel combines experts in computer graphics and associated technology with experts from a few application areas to discuss how computer graphics can advance discovery in many fields.

Organizer
David S. Ebert, Purdue University

Moderator
Andrew Glassner, Coyote Wind Films

Panelists
Bill Buxton, Alias|Wavefront, Inc.
Patricia Davies and David S. Ebert, Purdue University
Elliot Fishman, The Johns Hopkins University
Andrew Glassner, Coyote Wind Films

Games: the Dominant Medium of the Future
Driven by trends in silicon and software, computer gaming is the medium that will define 21st-century recreation in the way that motion pictures and their offspring, television, defined the culture of the 20th century. This panel of believers, skeptics, and observers debates whether and how gaming will dominate the future.

Organizer
Robert Nicoll, Electronic Arts

Moderator
Ken Perlin, New York University

Panelists
J.C.Herz, joystick nation
Bruce McMillan and Robert Nicoll, Electronic Arts
Ken Perlin, New York University
Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
Will Wright, Maxis Software

Graphics in the Large
The world of display devices is expanding rapidly, both literally and figuratively. New commercial and research devices come in larger sizes (measured in meters, not inches) and different physical forms (rectangular surfaces, cylindrical segments, truncated spheres). These new systems make computer graphics and interactive techniques far more amenable to group activities, because they can display more and more data simultaneously. This panel examines large graphics displayed on multiple devices that can be used by groups of co-located and distributed users and debates a key question: Is Bigger Necessarily Better?

Organizer/Moderator
David J. Kasik, Boeing Corporation

Panelists
Loren Carpenter, Pixar Animation Studios
Brian Fisher, University of British Columbia
David J. Kasik, Boeing Corporation
Richard May, University of Washington
Norbert Streitz, GMD Darmstadt

How Will Motion Capture Affect Animation?
In recent years, motion capture has been used more often and more intensively in the movie industry, for applications ranging from background action to major characters. This panel examines the critical motion-capture questions: When should motion capture be applied? How has it affected animators? How does the technology, both hardware and software, need to change?

Organizer
Suba Varadarajan, The Ohio State University

Moderator
Barb Helfer, The Ohio State University

Panelists
Meg Geroch, Wheeling Jesuit University
Evan Hirsch, Electronic Arts
Joan Staveley, Faust Logic Inc.
Tom Tolles, House of Moves Motion Capture Studios, LLC

Interactive Stories: Real Systems, Three Solutions
Enough theorizing and expostulating! These panelists build real interactive story systems, and they're ready to share their hard-earned knowledge of what works and what doesn't. They're also anticipating a lively debate on the relative merits of their approaches.

Organizer/Moderator
Noah Wardrip-Fruin, Brown University, University of Baltimore

Panelists
Michael Mateas, Carnegie Mellon University
Peter Molyneux, Lionhead Studios
Stuart Moulthrop, University of Baltimore
Andrew Stern, InteractiveStory.net
Noah Wardrip-Fruin, Brown University, University of Baltimore

Unsolved Problems in Mobile Computer Graphics and Interaction
The worldwide total of mobile computing devices now exceeds the installed base of PCs, but mobile technology has still not overcome problems with interaction, streaming, graphics algorithms, and bandwidth in current and future devices. This panel examines the state of the art from both an industrial and research point of view, and provides directions for future work in this area.

Organizer/Moderator
Mark Ollila, Linköping University

Panelists
Staffan Björk, Interactive Institute
Kevin Bradshaw, Digital Bridges
Steve Feiner, Columbia University
Mark Ollila, Linköping University
Kari Pulli, Nokia


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