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STUDENT GALLERY

Vol.33 No.2 May 1999
ACM SIGGRAPH

Computer Science Student Works Featured





May 99 Columns
Education CG Pioneers


Student Gallery
Previous Student Gallery Column

This month’s Student Gallery features programming projects from introductory computer science classes.  All of them involved writing programs in C or C++ and made use of various OpenGL libraries. Details about the courses and the individual assignments appear in the Education column in this issue of Computer Graphics.

We are always looking for student work in any area of computer graphics, and we hope you will consider sending us your students’ work.

Submission Guidelines

Images must be created by students. They may be created by individuals or groups of students. The act of creating an image must involve a computer in some way.

Teachers will submit images for their students. For each issue of Computer Graphics, a teacher may submit up to two images. Each image should be designated either a) K-12, b) art or c) technical.

Image may be submitted electronically or on 35mm slides. For electronic submissions, students will need to prepare two versions of their images. The first version should be a TIFF file that is 300 dpi and approximately five inches long in the longer dimension. In other words, the image should be approximately 1500 pixels in its longer dimension. The second version should be a .gif file containing a thumbnail no bigger than two inches at 72 dpi on its longest side (144 pixels long). Instructions and forms for electronic submission are located at our website.

Any student whose work is featured in Computer Graphics will receive a copy of the issue in which his or her work appears. In addition, both student and teacher will receive a small but much coveted prize. For additional information about this feature, visit the website or contact one of the jurors.



Stan Chisek
University of Illinois, Springfield
From Assignment 3 of CSC 481
Introduction to Computer Graphics
Scott Grissom, instructor

Ben Eadington Ben Eadington

Ben Eadington
California State University at Stanislaus
From Assignment 3 of CS 3600
Computer Graphics I
Steve Cunningham, instructor

Derek Boss

Derek Boss
University of Illinois, Springfield
From Assignment 3 of CSC 481
Introduction to Computer Graphics
Scott Grissom, instructor

Taram Devitt-Carolan
Taram Devitt-Carolan


Taram Devitt-Carolan
California Polytechnic State University (CalPoly)
From Assignment 4 in CSC 455
Introduction to Computer Graphics
Lew Hitchner, instructor

An interactive cinema. User can choose seat, open curtin, dim lights and view a movie.

Frank “Tony” Lavoie

Frank “Tony” Lavoie
DePaul University
From a final project for CSC 329
Computer Graphics I
A frame from an animation
Rosalee Wolfe, instructor

Liz Young

Liz Young
DePaul University
From a final project for CSC 329
Computer Graphics I
Texture and bump mapping
Rosalee Wolfe, instructor

Brad Ciraulo
Brad Ciraulo
Brad Ciraulo


Brad Ciraulo
California Polytechnic State University (CalPoly)
Assignment 3 in CSC 455
Introduction to Computer Graphics
Lew Hitchner, instructor


Rosalee J. Wolfe
DePaul University CST 401
243 S. Wabash Ave.
Chicago, IL 60604

Tel: +1-312-362-6248



Rosalee Wolfe obtained a masters of music from Indiana University before changing majors to earn a Ph.D. in computer science. She is a NASA Fellow, was SIGGRAPH Technical Slides Editor in 1993 and 1995-97 and edited Seminal Graphics for SIGGRAPH 98.

She also authored the 1997 education slide set on mapping techniques, co-created the first B.S. in human-computer interaction (at DePaul University) and is currently Director of the Division of Graphics and Human-Computer Interaction in the School of Computer Science, Telecommunications and Information Systems at DePaul University.


Jodi Giroux
Allen-Stevenson School
132 East 78th Street
New York, NY 10021

Tel: +1-212-288-7610

Jodi Giroux is a computer teacher at the Allen-Stevenson School in New York City where she works with students (K-9), faculty, staff and parents. She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in economics/French language and culture from Vassar College and a Master of Science degree in special education, behavioral/emotional disorders from Hunter College CUNY. Jodi has been involved in the field of educational technology in K-12 schools since 1992, publishing articles in educational journals, and coordinated an NSF sponsored teacher education grant.

She participated on the SIGGRAPH 97 and SIGGRAPH 98 Conference Educators Program Committees and is Co-Chair of the SIGGRAPH 99 Electronic Schoolhouse.


Lynn Pocock
New York Institute of Technology
P.O. Box 8000
Old Westbury, NY 11568-8000

Lynn Pocock is an artist, and Associate Professor of Fine Arts and Coordinator of Computer Graphics at New York Institute of Technology. Her artwork has often taken the form of experimental computer animation; her recent work takes the form of digital monotypes. Pocock’s art and research have been published in scholarly journals such as Leonardo and the Art Journal, and her artwork has been exhibited internationally, including in the New York Film and Video Expo, the London International Film Festival and SIGGRAPH’s Electronic Theater and Art Show. 

Currently, Pocock is coauthoring a book on computer animation, Vice Chair of NYC ACM SIGGRAPH and Conference Chair for the SIGGRAPH 2001 Conference in Los Angeles.

Karen Sullivan is a faculty member at Ringling School of Art and Design in the Department of Computer Animation and Foundation Studies. Her major focus of research is in concept, narrative and literacy for media and animation. Her video installations and single channel pieces have been shown nationwide. Karen received her M.F.A. from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and her B.F.A. from Indiana University, Bloomington.