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ACM SIGGRAPH Conflict of Interest Policy

What constitutes a conflict of interest?

A potential conflict of interest occurs when a person is involved in making a decision that:

Since the number of computer graphics professionals is relatively small, we can assume that there will be many cases where we make decisions involving someone who is known to us or with whom we have had some professional or personal association. A "close association" refers to a relative, a very close personal friend, a colleague from the same company or institution, or a colleague with whom there is a close professional relationship such as co-authorship or grant co-investigation.

Some examples of instances of associations that could cause a conflict of interest are:

A person determined to have a conflict of interest will not participate in the discussion or decision on the relevant issue.

Some examples relevant to ACM SIGGRAPH are:

Note: There will be additional examples that are specific to a given ACM SIGGRAPH committee. Each committee may determine additional examples that it considers to constitute a conflict of interest.

Resolution of conflict of interest

Potential conflicts of interest can be handled within the ACM SIGGRAPH volunteer infrastructure. A person on a given committee who has a potential conflict of interest should report it to the committee chair, and the committee chair will determine whether a conflict exists. A potential conflict of interest by a committee chair will be resolved by the volunteer to whom the committee reports. A potential conflict of interest by an Executive Committee member will be resolved by the ACM SIGGRAPH President. A potential conflict of interest by the ACM SIGGRAPH President will be resolved by the ACM SIGGRAPH Vice President.

A person determined to have a conflict of interest will not participate in the discussion or decision on the relevant issue.

Policy drafted by Judy Brown and approved by ACM SIGGRAPH Executive Committee May 4, 2002.