Radiosity OverView Part 4

Reference: SIGGRAPH 1993 Education Slide Set, by Stephen Spencer

Slide 21 : Conference Room Image.

This image shows a typical conference room.

Slide 22 : Conference Room Photograph.

For comparison, this image is an actual photograph of the conference room modeled and rendered in the previous slide.

Slide 23 : Theatre.

This image shows a model of a proposed theater near Candlestick Park in San Francisco, and contains 1,061,543 surface elements.

Slide 24 : Theatre With Polygonal Mesh.

This image is the same model of the proposed theater used in the previous slide, but with the surface element mesh visible.

Slide 25 : Steel Mill.

This image of a steel rolling mill was created using progressive radiosity. The original model contains about 30,000 polygons, which were subdivided into about 55,000 elements during the solution. It was computed on a DEC VAX 8700 and displayed using a Hewlett-Packard SRX graphics device.

Slide 26 : Le Corbusier's Chapel at Ronchamp.

This view of Le Corbusier's Chapel at Ronchamp was created using 4,000 steps of progressive radiosity. The stained glass windows were simulated using 113 area light sources. The radiosity solution was computed using Hewlett-Packard's licensable ARTCore Radiosity and Ray Tracing library running on an HP Model 835 TurboSRX workstation. The sunbeams were rendered using specially written ray tracing software run as a view-dependent post-process to the radiosity solution.

CREDITS:

The consolation room image and the composite progressive radiosity image were modeled by German Bauer, Kevin Simon, and Virginia Weinhold, using in-house modeling and animation software and rendered with the RADIANCE global illumination package. Copyright 1992, ACCAD, The Ohio State University.

The "color bleeding" image was modeled by Stephen Spencer using in-house modeling and animation software and rendered with the RADIANCE global illumination package. Copyright 1992, ACCAD, The Ohio State University.

The progressive variant images are courtesy of Shenchang Eric Chen, copyright 1988, Cornell University Program of Computer Graphics.

The participating medium image is courtesy of Holly Rushmeier. Copyright 1987, Cornell University Program of Computer Graphics.

The "conference room" image is courtesy of Greg Ward. Copyright 1990 Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, by Anat Grynberg and Greg Ward. It was rendered with the RADIANCE global illumination package.

The "conference room" photograph is courtesy of Greg Ward. The "Theater" images are courtesy of Dan Baum. The radiosity algorithms and software used in the creation of these images are described in:

"Making Radiosity Usable: Automatic Preprocessing and Meshing Techniques for the Generation of Accurate Radiosity Solutions," by Daniel R. Baum, Steve Mann, Kevin P. Smith and James W. Winget. Published in SIGGRAPH '91.

The hardware used to create these images was a Silicon Graphics 4D-310 GTX.

The Candlestick Theater architect is Mark Mack Architects.

Database modeling by Charles Ehrlich, Department of Architecture, University of California at Berkeley.

The "steel mill" image is courtesy of John Wallace, 3D/EYE Inc. It was produced by John Wallace and Stewart Feldman. Copyright 1987, Cornell University Program of Computer Graphics.

The "Ronchamp" image is courtesy of Eric Haines, 3D/EYE Inc. It was modeled by Keith Howie and Paul Boudreau, and rendered by Eric Haines. Copyright 1991, The Hewlett-Packard Company.

Special thanks go to Wayne Carlson, Peter Carswell, Yina Chang, Erika Galvao, Carol Gigliotti, Barb Helfer, James Kent, Stephen May, Kevin Simon, Stephen Spencer, and Virginia Weinhold, all faculty, students, and/or staff members of The Ohio State University Advanced Computing Center for the Arts and Design and the Ohio Supercomputer Center, for their assistance in creating the slides.

Thanks also to Greg Ward, designer of the RADIANCE global illumination rendering system, for his assistance with debugging images and programs.


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Last changed April 01, 1998, G. Scott Owen, owen@siggraph.org