Program
Date & Time
Computer Animation Festival - Animation Theater
Computer Animation Festival - Animation Theater 3
Room 307A/B
Saturday
18 December
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Computer Animation Festival - Animation Theater
Computer Animation Festival - Animation Theater 1
Room 307A/B
Thursday
16 December
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Computer Animation Festival - Animation Theater
Computer Animation Festival - Animation Theater 2
Room 307A/B
Friday
17 December
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Computer Animation Festival - Electronic Theater
Computer Animation Festival - Electronic Theater 2
Auditorium

A two-hour overview of the best animations, visual effects, and scientific visualizations produced in the last year. The jury assembled this show to represent the must-see works in computer graphics for 2010. The Electronic Theater also includes a few pieces shown by special invitation. On opening night, 16 December, the Electronic Theater begins with presentation of the Computer Animation Festival's Best of Show and Best Technical Awards.

Friday
17 December
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Computer Animation Festival - Electronic Theater
Computer Animation Festival - Electronic Theater 3
Auditorium

A two-hour overview of the best animations, visual effects, and scientific visualizations produced in the last year. The jury assembled this show to represent the must-see works in computer graphics for 2010. The Electronic Theater also includes a few pieces shown by special invitation. On opening night, 16 December, the Electronic Theater begins with presentation of the Computer Animation Festival's Best of Show and Best Technical Awards.

Saturday
18 December
4:15 PM - 6:15 PM
Computer Animation Festival - Electronic Theater
Computer Animation Festival - Electronic Theater 4
Auditorium

A two-hour overview of the best animations, visual effects, and scientific visualizations produced in the last year. The jury assembled this show to represent the must-see works in computer graphics for 2010. The Electronic Theater also includes a few pieces shown by special invitation. On opening night, 16 December, the Electronic Theater begins with presentation of the Computer Animation Festival's Best of Show and Best Technical Awards.

Saturday
18 December
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Computer Animation Festival - Electronic Theater
Computer Animation Festival - Electronic Theater 1
Auditorium

A two-hour overview of the best animations, visual effects, and scientific visualizations produced in the last year. The jury assembled this show to represent the must-see works in computer graphics for 2010. The Electronic Theater also includes a few pieces shown by special invitation. On opening night, 16 December, the Electronic Theater begins with presentation of the Computer Animation Festival's Best of Show and Best Technical Awards.

Thursday
16 December
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Computer Animation Festival - Talks
The Clone Wars: Setting the Bar for TV Animation
Auditorium

Translating George Lucas’ vision to the small screen is an incredible task. To say there is no other TV animation like it is an understatement. Every episode is a cinematic work of art. Currently in its third season, "The Clone Wars" has redefined the quality, complexity, and expectations for TV animation. In this session, Jass Mun, Senior FX Artist for Lucasfilm Animation Singapore, talks about the production pipeline and how the production teams, from layout to final compositing, work together to deliver these high-quality episodes on deadline. The talk emphasizes production of effects for the episodes.

Thursday
16 December
5:00 PM - 5:45 PM
Computer Animation Festival - Talks
Behind-the-Scenes of VFX on Feature Films
Auditorium

In this presentation, VFX supervisiors from DIGITALIDEA talk about creating VFX shots: how previsualization is used to design and simulate difficult shots; how digital matte painting is used to create virtual backgrounds; how crowd simulation, set extension, and digital environments are created; and how they all come together to bring the director's vision to reality.
Having worked on over 200 feature films,

Thursday
16 December
4:15 PM - 5:00 PM
Courses
Creating Amazing Effects With GPU Shaders
Room 308B/C

Presented in English / 영어로 발표 됨

Shader programming has become an indispensible part of graphics application development. But learning to program shaders is difficult, and it is especially difficult to understand the effect of shader parameters. This course presents shader development from an interactive standpoint. It discusses vertex, fragment, and geometry shaders, shader-specific theory, and the GLSL 4.0 shader language, then reviews the graphics pipeline, including features rarely taught in beginning courses, but exposed in shaders, and shows how shaders fit into the pipeline operations. Each class of shaders is introduced with glman examples that explain details of the concept.

The OpenGL 4.0 and GLSL 4.0 specifications were recently released. While most attendees will not yet have compatible hardware on their laptops, the course explains what is new in this release and the extra functions it can perform. Attendees receive free software so they can follow along and interact with examples.

Saturday
18 December
2:15 PM - 6:00 PM
Courses
Creating New Interfaces for Musical Expression: Introduction to NIME
Room 314

Presented in English / 영어로 발표 됨

Due to advances in digital audio technologies, computers now play a role in most music production and performance. Digital technologies offer unprecedented opportunities for creation and manipulation of sound, but the flexibilty of these new technologies implies an often confusing array of choices for musical composers and performers. Some artists are using computers directly to create music and generate an explosion of new musical forms. However, most would agree that the computer is not a musical instrument, in the same sense as traditional instruments, and it is natural to wonder "how to play the computer" using interface technology appropriate for human brains and bodies.

A decade ago, the presenters of this course organized the first workshop on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME), to attempt to answer this question by exploring connections with the better-established field of human-computer interaction. The course summarizes what has been learned at the NIME conferences. It begins with an overview of the theory and practice of new musical interface design and asks: What makes a good musical interface? Are any useful design principles or guidelines available? Then it reviews topics such as mapping from human action to musical output and control intimacy, and presents practical information about the tools for creating musical interfaces, including an overview of sensors and microcontrollers, audio synthesis techniques, and communication protocols such as Open Sound Control (and MIDI). The remainder of the course consists of several specific case studies of the major broad themes of the NIME conference, including augmented and sensor-based instruments, mobile and networked music, and NIME pedagogy.

Friday
17 December
9:00 AM - 12:45 PM
Courses
Cross-Cultural User-Interface Design
Room 308A

Presented in English / 영어로 발표 됨

User interfaces for desktop, web, mobile, and vehicle applications reach across culturally diverse user communities, sometimes within a single country or language group, and certainly throughout the world. If user interfaces are to be usable, useful, and appealing to such a wide range of audiences, user-interface and user-experience developers must account for cultural preferences in globalizing and localizing products and services. In this tutorial, attendees learn about culture models, culture characteristics, and practical principles and techniques of design and analysis that are immediately useful in both current and next-generation products and services. As the course concludes, attendees have an opportunity to put their new understanding into practice through a series of pen-and-paper exercises.

Wednesday
15 December
2:15 PM - 6:00 PM
Courses
DirectX 11: Learn the Latest Tricks
Room E6

Presented in English, translated simultaneously to Korean / 영어로 발표 됨 (한국어 동시 통역)

This course explains the various components of DirectX 11, such as direct compute, tessellation, multi-threaded command buffers, dynamic shader linking, new texture-compression formats, read-only depth, conservative oDepth, etc.

Friday
17 December
4:15 PM - 6:00 PM
Courses
Efficient Substitutes for Subdivision Surfaces in Feature-Quality Games
Room E5

Presented in English / 영어로 발표 됨

As real-time graphics aspires to movie-quality rendering, higher-order, smooth-surface representations take center stage. Catmull-Clark subdivision surfaces are the dominant higher-order surface type used in feature films, as they can model surfaces of arbitrary topological type and provide a compact representation for smooth surfaces that facilitate modeling and animation. But their use has been hindered in real-time applications because the exact evaluation of such surfaces on modern GPUs is neither memory nor performance efficient. The advent of DirectX 11, recent theoretical results in efficient substitutes for subdivision surfaces, and recent hardware advances offer the possibility to see real-time cinematic rendering in the near future.

This course covers the hardware tessellation part of the SIGGRAPH 2009 Course Efficient Substitutes for Subdivision Surfaces with the emphasis on character tessellation in movie-quality games. It adds additional material based on recent research findings and practical optimizations. The goal of this course is to familiarize attendees with the practical aspects of introducing substitutes in subdivision surfaces to increase efficiency in real-time applications.

The course begins by highlighting the properties that make SubD modeling attractive and introduces some recent techniques to capture these properties by alternative surface representations with a smaller foot-print. It lists and compares the new surface representations and focuses on their implementation on current and next-generation GPUs, then addresses crucial practical issues, such as watertight evaluation, creases and corners, view-dependent displacement occlusion mapping, and LOD computation. Finally and most importantly, it explains how these advanced techniques have been adopted into their gaming pipelines.

Thursday
16 December
9:00 AM - 10:45 AM
Courses
Exploiting Temporal Coherence in Real-Time Rendering
Room 314

Presented in English / 영어로 발표 됨

Temporal coherence, the correlation of content between adjacent rendered frames, exists across a wide range of scenes and motion types in practical real-time rendering. Taking advantage of temporal coherence can save redundant computation and significantly improve the performance of many rendering tasks with only a marginal decrease in quality. This not only allows incorporation of more computationally intensive shading effects in existing applications, but it also offers exciting opportunities to extend high-end graphics applications to reach lower-spec, consumer-level hardware.

This introduces the concepts of temporal coherence and provides the working practical and theoretical knowledge required to exploit temporal coherence in a variety of shading tasks. It begins with an introduction to the general idea of temporal coherence in rendering and an overview of the recent developments in the field. Then it focuses on a key technique: reverse reprojection cache, which is the foundation of many applications. The course explains a number of extensions of the basic algorithm for assisting in multi-pass shading effects, shader antialiasing, casting shadows, and global-illumination effects. And it introduces several more general coherence topics beyond pixel reuse, including visibility-culling optimization and object-space global-illumination approximations. For all the major techniques and applications covered, implementation and practical issues involved in development are addressed in detail.

The course emphasizes "know how" and the guidelines related to algorithm choices. After attending the course, participants are encouraged to find and utilize temporal coherence in their own applications and rapidly adapt existing algorithms to meet their requirements.

Saturday
18 December
2:15 PM - 6:00 PM
Courses
Geometry Simulation for Feature Films
Room 308B/C

Presented in English / 영어로 발표 됨

This course introduces how simulations have used flesh mesh, cloth mesh, and rigid bodies in VFX movies such as "Avatar", "Terminator", "Indiana Jones", and "Transformer". The main focus is on how CG artists plan the simulation setup to achieve efficient dynamic effects.

The first section of the course describes the process of setting up a realistic tree simulation in a very heavy and complex 3D model for "Avatar". Attendees learn how to plan and prepare a simulation setup from complex and heavy geometry. The second section explains the destruction simulation that was developed for "Indiana Jones 4" and "Transformer 2". Attendees learn how to use fracture techniques to break the geometry and how to use the fragment-clustering system to control rigid simulation. In the third section, attendees learn how various dynamic constraints and deformable rigid simulation were used in car-crash simulations and the multiple-layer simulation setup on "Terminator 4".

Saturday
18 December
9:00 AM - 12:45 PM
Courses
"Gimmee Somethin' to Shoot": Filming the Cinematics for Starcraft II: Wings of Liberty
Auditorium

Presented in Korean and English, translated simultaneously / 한국어와 영어로 발표됨 (동시 통역)

Blizzard Entertainment has been creating some of the world's most engaging entertainment software for nearly two decades. Each Blizzard game is built on a rich universe that provides the backdrop for some of the most epic, elaborate stories found in the games medium. The Blizzard Film Department has played a key role in telling these stories ever since the premiere of their cinematics for WarCraft II in 1995. The team hit its stride with Diablo II in 2000, showcasing the tale of the Wanderer. Shortly after that, it won awards for the cinematics featured in Warcraft III: Reign of Chaos and its expansion Warcraft III: The Frozen Throne, and went on to create the epic opening piece for the world's most popular subscription-based, massively multiplayer online role-playing game, World of Warcraft. Subsequently, the Blizzard Film Department created cinematics for each of the game's expansions (World of Warcraft: The Burning Crusade, World of Warcraft: Wrath of the Lich King, and the upcoming World of Warcraft: Cataclysm). This year marks the department's return to the StarCraft universe with the release of the greatly anticipated StarCraft II: Wings of Liberty.

In this course, members of the Blizzard Film Department share some of the secrets of creating their on-screen magic for StarCraft II: Wings of Liberty, including the creative and technical processes, from story to completion. They also shed some light on sequences rendered in the game's engine, a technique that allows for creation of much more content than would be practical using only traditional rendering methods. Course topics include: 3D modeling, animation, rigging, simulations, lighting, compositing, rendering, and artistic and technical direction.

Saturday
18 December
9:00 AM - 12:45 PM
Courses
Build Your Own 3D Display
Room E6

Presented in English / 영어로 발표 됨

Commercial stereoscopic displays have re-emerged in the consumer market, and film studios routinely produce live-action and animated 3D content for theatrical release. While primarily enabled by the widespread adoption of digital projection, which allows accurate view synchronization, the underlying 3D display technologies have changed little in the last few decades. Theatrical systems rely on stereoscopic display: projecting a left/right image pair separated by various filters in glasses worn by viewers. In contrast, several LCD manufactures are introducing automultiscopic displays, which allow view-dependent imagery to be perceived without special glasses. 3D display is poised for another resurgence.

This hands-on introduction to 3D display provides attendees with the mathematics, software, and practical details necessary to build their own low-cost stereoscopic displays. An example-driven approach is used throughout. Each new concept is illustrated by a practical 3D display implemented with off-the-shelf parts. First, glasses-bound stereoscopic displays are explained. Detailed plans are provided for attendees to construct their own LCD shutter glasses. Next, unencumbered automultiscopic displays are explained, including step-by-step directions to construct lenticular and parallax-barrier designs using modified LCDs. All the necessary software, including algorithms for rendering and calibration, is provided for each example, so attendees can quickly construct 3D displays for their own educational, amusement, and research purposes.

The course concludes by describing various methods for capturing, rendering, and viewing various multi-view imagery sources. Stereoscopic OpenGL support is reviewed, as well as methods for ray-tracing multi-view imagery with POV-Ray. Techniques for capturing "live-action" light fields are also outlined. Finally, recent developments are summarized and attendees are encouraged to evolve the capabilities of their self-built 3D displays.

Friday
17 December
2:15 PM - 4:00 PM
Courses
Recent Advances in Real-Time Collision and Proximity Computations for Games and Simulations
Room 314

Presented in English / 영어로 발표 됨

Significant recent advances in collision detection and other proximity queries have made it quite challenging for beginners to keep up with all the published papers and existing rendering systems. This half-day course explains current algorithms and their efficient implementation for interactive games, movies, physically based simulations, robotics, and CAD/CAM.

The course summarizes how recent developments achieve interactive performance for large-scale rigid, articulated, deforming, and fracturing models in various applications. Then it explores how various proximity computations can be optimized in recent GPUs and integrated with efficient GPU-based simulation methods. This overview of existing techniques and practical solutions helps attendees understand how the field will change in the coming years.

Saturday
18 December
9:00 AM - 12:45 PM
Courses
Procedural Shading in RenderMan
Room E6

Presented in English, translated simultaneously to Korean / 영어로 발표 됨 (한국어 동시 통역)

Proceduralism is a powerful concept in computer graphics. It facilitates scenes of enormous scale, exquisite varieties of detail, and impressive efficiency. However, artists who are fluent in procedural techniques are still rare, and many studios miss out on the possibilities that this exciting field offers. This course explores how to create procedural shaders without programming, using Pixar's industry standard renderer, RenderMan, and its Autodesk Maya-based front-end, RenderMan Studio.
The first section of the course is an overview of RenderMan, its history, use in the industry, important features, and how it works. Topics include the Reyes pipeline and how it has helped to create some of the most impressive visuals in computer graphics, and proceduralism: its pros and cons, both in general and as it applies to shading.

The second section is a live demonstration of how to create a procedural animated shader for an orange that ages over time, from unripe to fresh to old and dusty. The demo begins with a sphere in Maya, then shows how to create all the detail using a shading network in RenderMan Studio. No textures are used. The look is created entirely with noise, splines, displacement, and more! Finally, the course presents examples of how the techniques used in shading the orange apply in industry and beyond.

Thursday
16 December
9:00 AM - 10:45 AM
Courses
Scattered Data Interpolation for Computer Graphics
Room 314

Presented in English / 영어로 발표 됨

Interpolation is a fundamental topic in computer graphics. While textbooks have generally focused on "regular" interpolation schemes such as B-splines, scattered interpolation approaches also have been a wide variety of applications. These include topics in facial animation, skinning, morphing, rendering, and fluid simulation.

This best-practice guide to scattered data interpolation reviews the major algorithms for scattered interpolation, shows how and where they are applied in a variety of published graphics studies, and compares and contrasts them. The algorithms include Shepard interpolation, Wiener interpolation, Laplace and thin-plate interpolation, radial basis functions (RBFs), moving least squares, and kernel regression. The course summarizes stability and computational properties with a focus on real-time applications and provides some theoretical insights to broaden the course's engineering perspective.

Wednesday
15 December
9:00 AM - 12:45 PM
Courses
"Toy Story 3" Double Feature: Characters and Lighting
Room E1-E4

Presented in English, translated simultaneously to Korean / 영어로 발표 됨 (한국어 동시 통역)

This course explores rebuilding and relighting the Toy Story characters, their worlds, and their human co- stars, and ensuring that they remained familiar and recognizable to the audiences who saw them 11 years ago in "Toy Story 2".

The tools available in computer graphics have significantly improved during the last decade. Technologies such as ambient occlusion, subsurface scattering, efficient Indirect Illumination, and subdivision surfaces either did not exist or were in their infancy when "Toy Story 2" was released in 1999. Audiences have also developed higher expectations for the visuals in contemporary animated films. New and improved technologies add welcome richness and depth, but they must be used carefully, to make sure that familiar characters do not become strangers.

For "Toy Story 3", the Pixar team had to rebuild all the models, both characters and sets, yet make them appear exactly the same as their earlier incarnations. As they increased the level of detail and visual richness, they had to maintain a consistent design that would be recognizable from the preceding two films. The course explanations of visual storytelling through lighting, early prototypes of Lotso, and many examples of the team's successes and failures.

Wednesday
15 December
10:00 AM - 12:45 PM
Courses
An Introduction to OpenGL 4.0 Programming
Room E5

Presented in English / 영어로 발표 됨

OpenGL is the most widely available library for creating interactive computer graphics applications across all of the major computer operating systems. Its uses range from creating applications for scientific visualizations to computer-aided design, interactive gaming and entertainment, and with each new version, its capabilities reveal the most up-to-date features of modern graphics hardware.

This course provides an accelerated introduction to programming OpenGL with an emphasis on the most modern methods for using the library. OpenGL has undergone numerous updates in recent years, which have fundamentally changed how programmers interact with the application programming interface (API) and the skills required for being an effective OpenGL programmer. The most notable of those changes was the introduction of shader-based rendering, which was introduced into the API many years ago, but has recently expanded to subsume almost all functionality in OpenGL. The course summarizes each of the shader stages in OpenGL version 4.0 and methods for specifying data to be used in rendering with OpenGL.

While the annual SIGGRAPH conferences have presented numerous courses on OpenGL over the years, recent revisions to the API, culminating in OpenGL version 4.0, have provided a wealth of new functionality and features that enable creation of ever-richer content. This course builds from demonstrating the use of the most fundamental shader-based OpenGL pipeline to introducing all of the latest shader stages.

Saturday
18 December
9:00 AM - 12:45 PM
Courses
Introduction to Using RenderMan
Off-Site Venue

Presented in English / 영어로 발표 됨

This full-day course is an intensive, hands-on practical introduction to Pixar's RenderMan.

In the first part of the course, attendees gain sufficient familiarity with RenderMan's scene-description protocol to edit and manipulate RIB files, which allow modeling and animation applications to communicate with RenderMan. The second part of the course introduces the RenderMan Shading Language (RSL). The goal of this section is to provide an overview of the creative potential of the shading language so attendees can continue their own independent exploration of the shading language. During the final part of the course, attendees are introduced to the Python scripting language and Pixar's PRMan.

Saturday
18 December
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Courses
Simulating Believable Crowd and Group Behaviors
Room 314

Presented in English / 영어로 발표 됨

Crowds and groups are a vital element of life, and simulating them in a convincing manner is one of the great challenges in computer graphics and interactive techniques. This course focuses on the problem of efficiently simulating realistic crowd and group behavior for a range of applications, including games and design of spaces. It covers data-driven methods, where the characteristics of crowds are simulated based on real-world data; evaluation and perceptual issues, and creation of behavioral variety; interactive simulation and control of large-scale crowds and traffic for games and other real-time applications; and finally a case study of using crowd simulation for design of spaces in the Disney theme parks.

Thursday
16 December
2:15 PM - 6:00 PM