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In my creative process, I begin with a numerical formula as a universal language and then develop it into various media. As a result, I spend a great deal of time constituting the system. However, at this stage, there is hardly anything visual apart from small graphs.

I can only imagine the visual result, and I have to depend on my own sense of the fluctuating structure when I constitute the system. Once I get to the stage of making a collection of graphs into an artwork, I try to take such factors as human physicality and memory into the work, which makes it more than just a visual image.

I believe that art is not intended to be a gateway to understanding the artist's system, but a method of activating the viewers' psychological-motion systems (memory and physical sensation). These should be triggered by looking at the artwork. When viewers can realise their own feelings and memories, the artwork is truly completed. The systems activated in the mind of the viewer can be different, depending on the medium of the work. Even if the artist has created only one system in the computer, the image generated has to be properly selected.

This series is supported by the Aihara Complexity Modeling Project at JST ERATO, and the artist is a member of the project.

Keiko Kimoto