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Brit Bunkley

Wanganui, NEW ZEALAND
brit@ihug.co.nz

Yield Dispalced
22" x 34" x 3"

Artist Statement:“Yield Displaced” is one of several digitally produced sculptures that I completed as a “Working Artist” at Siggraph 2002 in San Antonio. This sculpture is a paper LOM (Layered Object Manufactured object) rapid prototype. This process builds an object (called a “part”) by laying down individual layers of 22” wide sticky paper (similar to masking tape). Each cross section of the part is then cut by a laser. The laser only cuts deep enough through one layer of paper at a time. Each piece of paper sticks to each previous layer eventually building a complete rapid prototype made up of a hundreds of paper layers. The final “part”, which resembles a block of wood, is then “de-cubed”. At this stage, the waste sections of the material are easily removed in cube-like pieces.

The 3d LOM in “Yield Displaced” was made by sending the 3d STL file to Select Mfg. Services, Grand Rapids, Michigan, via an e-mail attachment. The LOM was then returned to San Antonio where I “de-cubed” it by removing the waste material, and finally finished by sanding and coating the surface with polyurethane.

At the initial design stage, I utilized the “displaced map modifier” in my 3d software Autodesk 3d Viz (a sister program to 3d Studio Max). This modifier functions by virtually “pushing” a dense wire frame mesh. The dark areas of the photo bitmap of the “hazard” road sign (from New Zealand) “push” the mesh in the light areas of the image, while “pulling” the dark areas. This action creates a relief of the image in the wire mesh 3d virtual object - sometimes producing objects with interesting and strange results depending on the settings of the modifier.

Following the logic of Joseph Kosuth’s “One and Three Chairs”, the original image (used as the bitmap in the displaced modifier) is also included as part of the work as a mounted 2d print on aluminium underneath the 3d distorted object.

"Hazard Displaced" is one of several digitally fabricated sculptures that I completed as a “Working Artist” at Siggraph 2002 in San Antonio. This work is a CNC object carved from hard foam on a machine that is directed by software. The software “reads” a 3d file representing the object and sends signals to the machine that then cuts the material according to the topography of the 3d STL file.
Hazard Displaced
14" x 22" x 2"