(click on thumbnail to view a larger version)



Chung Kyu Kim

Troy, New York USA
kimc4@rpi.edu
Afterimages


Artist Statement: The previous generation lived in what could be called the "television culture," and the next generation will live in a "computer culture." My generation lives in an era between the two. Television and computer media are among the most significant inventions of what could be called the modern information system; however, we are often unaware of the effects these media have on our consciousness. "Afterimages" raises questions about the influences and effects of television and the computer on the cultures they create.

The sculpture consists of five stacked monitors: four monitors showing digital body animation and the top monitor acting as the body's eyes and mind, projecting their point of view under the influence of the television and computer cultures. My intent is to represent the influence of these cultures on the audience's bodies and brains through the electronic body in the monitor screens and the video images in the top monitor.

The intent is to suggest the loss of our natural minds to technologies and machines. New technologies influence our minds slowly; we often cannot detect the effects. "Afterimages" captures the idea that we do not easily realize the loss of our minds.

"Afterimages" is concerned with the matter of creativity, which has been regarded as the main permanent power of artists since the Stone Age. However, technology is affecting the natural human brain and creativity, and future artists may lose their natural creativity. The sculpture is a caution to all people, including artists, who use technology carelessly.

The present generation is confused because we are living between television culture and computer culture, but only the present generation can recognize the problems associated with the technology. "Afterimages" suggests the invisible effects of digital technology and television technology, effects that presently have no name.